Soup tureens modeled as pheasants. I guess you could put stew in them too. Ceramic. Different makers and times. All fun.

Glazed ceramic pheasant tureen. 20th c. Italian. Maker’s marks: numbered “325168”, marked “Italy”; impressed “28” to the underside. Image © 2002-2021 LiveAuctioneers and Hindmans Auctions. Fair use license. via https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/109173569_an-italian-glazed-ceramic-pheasant-tureen
Majolica ceramic trompe l’oeil pheasant covered tureen. ca. 1910. French. Digoin and Sarreguemines, maker. Image
© 2021 Chairish, Inc. Fair use license. via https://www.chairish.com/product/3275843/antique-french-sarreguemines-majolica-trompe-loeil-pheasant-covered-tureen
Pheasant tureen. 1825. English. Pearlware ceramic enameled in bright colors. Staffordshire Pottery, maker. Image ©2021 Antique Pottery of John Howard at Heritage, http://www.johnhoward.co.uk. Fair use license. via https://www.antiquepottery.co.uk/staffordshire-pottery-pearlware-pheasant-tureen-in-bright-enamel-colours-antique-period-c1820/

Portraits of African animals, hand colored aquatints (watercolors), taken from Samuel and William Daniell’s 1804 work “African Scenery and Animals”. From a family of landscape artists, Samuel Daniells traveled extensively in Africa with his brother William where they drew as they went, publishing their work after. All of these being offered in one lot by Doyle Auctions in New York.

“The African Rhinoceros.” 1804-1805. British. Hand-colored aquatint. Published by the artist in London. Image © 2002-2021 LiveAuctioneers. and Doyle New York. Fair use license. via https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/108742033_samuel-daniell-the-hippopotamus-the-african-hog-the
“The Hippopotamus.” 1804-1805. British. Hand-colored aquatint. Published by the artist in London. Image © 2002-2021 LiveAuctioneers. and Doyle New York. Fair use license. via https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/108742033_samuel-daniell-the-hippopotamus-the-african-hog-the
“The Klip-springer.” 1804-1805. British. Hand-colored aquatint. Published by the artist in London. Image © 2002-2021 LiveAuctioneers. and Doyle New York. Fair use license. via https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/108742033_samuel-daniell-the-hippopotamus-the-african-hog-the
“The African Hog.” 1804-1805. British. Hand-colored aquatint. Published by the artist in London. Image © 2002-2021 LiveAuctioneers. and Doyle New York. Fair use license. via https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/108742033_samuel-daniell-the-hippopotamus-the-african-hog-the

Regency era ladies painted by portraitist John James Masquerier who lived from 1778 to 1855. British, he was of Huguenot descent. Studied art in Paris and in London.

Portrait of Frances Mary Richardson Currer  of Eshton Hall. 1807. British. Image source: ncbpt.org.uk. Private collection. In the public domain in the United States because the artist died over 70 years ago. via  https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frances_Mary_Richardson_Currer_1807.PNG
Portrait of Eliza, Lady Becher (1791-1872). ca. 1815. British. Oil on canvas. Given to the National Portrait Gallery in 1877. Collections of the National Portrait Gallery. In the public domain in the United States because the artist died over 100 years ago. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Eliza,_Lady_Becher_by_John_James_Masquerier.jpg
Full length portrait of Lady Hamilton, sitting by the window on a couch, directed to the left, looking upwards at the moon, window overlooking the ocean. 1806. Mezzotint made by William Say after John James Masquerier. Image © The Trustees of the British Museum. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/image/949834001
Half-length portrait of Miss O’Neill, sitting, directed to the front, facing and looking to the left, arms at her side, sharl partly covering her right arm. 1816. British. Mezzotint printed in colors. Print made by William Say after John James Masquerier. Daniel Cox, publisher. Image © The Trustees of the British Museum. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://www.britishmuseum.org/collection/object/P_1837-0513-189

Decorate up the powder room walls with design possibilities taken from Robert Brook’s “Elements of Style in Furniture and Woodwork” which was published in London and came out in 1889. All of these with an Italian Renaissance theme in case the Medici stop by.

“Italian Renaissance.” Page 38. Collections of the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. University of Toronto, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/elementsofstylei00broo/page/n39/mode/1up
“Italian Renaissance.” Page 43. Collections of the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. University of Toronto, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/elementsofstylei00broo/page/n43/mode/1up
“Italian Renaissance.” Page 45. Collections of the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. University of Toronto, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/elementsofstylei00broo/page/n45/mode/1up

Up into the Arctic and down to the Antarctic with English watercolorist Charles Hamilton Smith who was also a Lieutenant-Colonel in the Royal Artillery. Living from 1776 to 1859, he painted what he saw as he traveled around the world during his military career.

“Spitzbergen, Bearing South,” from the collection of 75 watercolors entitled “Views of Polar Regions”. 19th c. English. Watercolor and graphite. Collections of the Yale Center for British Arts, New Haven. Image © Yale Center for British Arts. Artwork itself in the public domain due to age. via https://wanderingvertexes.blogspot.com/2021/08/newtontoppen-spitzbergen-by-charles.html
“Remarkable Iceberg seen in July, 1818.” ca. 1818. English. Watercolor and graphite on moderately thick, moderately textured wove paper. Collections of the Collections of the Yale Center for British Arts, New Haven. Image © Yale Center for British Arts, Paul Mellon Collection. Artwork itself in the public domain due to age. via https://artsandculture.google.com/asset/remarkable-iceberg-charles-hamilton-smith-1776%E2%80%931859-belgian/kwFvKsdBrhN6Xw
“Victoria lands, South Polar Regions: Mont Erebus, Ross Island, Antarctica,” from the collection of 75 watercolors entitled “Views of Polar Regions”. 19th c. English. Watercolor and graphite. Collections of the Yale Center for British Arts, New Haven. Image © Yale Center for British Arts. Artwork itself in the public domain due to age. via https://wanderingvertexes.blogspot.com/2019/10/erebus-seen-by-charles-hamilton-smith.html
“Mount Sabine, Victoria Land,  Antarctica, discovered in 1841,” from the collection of 75 watercolors entitled “Views of Polar Regions”. ca. 1841. English. Watercolor. Collections of the Yale Center for British Arts, New Haven. Image © Yale Center for British Arts. Artwork itself in the public domain due to age. via https://wanderingvertexes.blogspot.com/2019/11/mount-sabine-by-charles-hamilton-smith.html

Beautiful textiles produced by Alexander Morton (1844-1923). Starting out selling muslins created in weavers’ homes, Morton established his own factory and produced fabrics with designs he bought from the Silver Studio and Bailie Scott, amongst others. His fabrics were carried by Liberty of London. Morton was born in Scotland but his factories were in Ireland.

Cotton textile with a design inspired by Sardinian peasant embroideries. 1926. British. Cotton in a plain weave with brocading in chenille yarns. Alexander Morton, designer. Image © Cooper Hewitt Museum. Fair use license. via https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18343651/
Wool and silk woven furnishing fabric, double cloth with silk pockets in an Italian style with floral and leaf tracery. ca. 1891. British. Alexander Morton and Company, maker. Courtaulds Design Library Collections, Victoria and Albert Museum. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2021. Fair use license. via https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O1434621/furnishing-fabric-alexander-morton/
Furnishing fabric woven with a tapestry effect with peacocks, flowers, tulips, vines, and leaves. 1890-1900. British. Wool and cotton. Alexander Morton and Company, maker. Courtaulds Design Library Collections, Victoria and Albert Museum. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2021. Fair use license. via https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O1434568/furnishing-fabric-alexander-morton/

Visions of an earlier Greece back in 1801 to 1806, back when it was part of the Ottoman Empire. Illustrative plates from Volume I of Edward Dodwell’s 1819 work “A Classical and topographical tour through Greece.” Published in London.

“Sacred well at Patra.” Page 150. British. From a drawing by S. Pomardi. Smith, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/classicaltopogra01dodw/page/n150/mode/1up
“Drawbridge at Corfu.” Page 63. British. From a drawing by S. Pomardi. Charles Heath, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/classicaltopogra01dodw/page/n63/mode/1up
“Zakunthos.” Page 113. British. From a drawing by S. Pomardi. William Lizars, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/classicaltopogra01dodw/page/n113/mode/1up

“Salona.” Page 179. British. After a drawing by Edward Dodwell. Radcliffe, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/classicaltopogra01dodw/page/n179/mode/1up

Off on a holiday to various places with British painter Edward Henry Holder (1847-1922).

“Rievaulx Abbey, from the South.” 1880. British. Oil on canvas. Collectios of and photographed by the York Art Gallery. In the public domain. via https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/rievaulx-abbey-from-the-south-8412
“The Gorge and Palm Grove, Victoria Falls.” Undated but probably painted towards the end of his career when he visited South Africa. He exhibited a similar work in 1917 at the Royal Academy under the title “The Rainbow Falls: Victoria Falls on the Zambesi, Rhodesia.” British. Oil on canvas. SIgned “E. Henry Holder” on the lower right. Inscribed with the title on the stretcher verso.  Image © Bonhams 2001-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/15349/lot/17/
“Hackness Wood, near Scarborough.” 1880. British. Oil on canvas. Oil on canvas. Collectios of and photographed by the York Art Gallery. In the public domain. via https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/hackness-wood-near-scarborough-8416

Mirror frames that were old in 1836, one coming with its own furniture. Not your average Ikea kind of thing. Plates from Samuel Rush Meyrick’s “Specimens of Ancient Furniture.” Published in London by William Pickering. The illustrations drawn by Henry Shaw from existing authorities.

“Looking glass, of the time of Queen Elizabeth, in the possession of Sir Samuel Meyrick, Goodrich Court, Hertfordshire.” Page 26. Drawn and engraved by Henry Shaw. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/specimensofancie00meyr/page/26/mode/1up
“French looking glass, from Willimen’s ‘Monuments français inédits.” Page 39. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/specimensofancie00meyr/page/n39/mode/1up
“Silver furniture, at Knole Park, a seat of the Countess of Plymouth, date the time of James II.” page 41. Drawn and engraved by Henry Shaw. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/specimensofancie00meyr/page/n41/mode/1up

Embroidery patterns from the “Lady’s Magazine.” Run up a veil on your sewing machine with these and look like Charlotte, Princess Royal.

“New and Elegant Patterns for Children’s Caps,” engraved for the Lady’s Magazine. 1810. British, published in London. Special Collections and Archives, Cardiff University. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://archive.org/details/LMG00009
“New and Elegant Pattern for a Veil or Bottom of a Dress,” engraved for the Lady’s Magazine. 1810. British, published in London. Special Collections and Archives, Cardiff University. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://archive.org/details/LMG00006

“An Elegant New Pattern for the Head-piece and Border of a Cap,” engraved for the Lady’s Magazine. 1812. British, published in London. Special Collections and Archives, Cardiff University. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://archive.org/details/LMG00016
New Pattern for a Frill and Ruff,” engraved for the Lady’s Magazine. 1812. Published in London, England.  Special Collections and Archives, Cardiff University. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://archive.org/details/LMG00023