Art from the Symbolist school, these by the naturalized French artist Léonard Sarluis, who was born in the Netherlands. Living from 1874 to 1949, he arrived in Paris at the age of 20 and stayed. Liked biblical themes.

"Déesse égyptienne devant un roi babylonien."
“Déesse égyptienne devant un roi babylonien.” 1926. Painting. Signed on the lower left. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:D%C3%A9esse-egyptienne-devant-un-roi-babylonien.jpg
Scène biblique : la Trinité."  1945.
“Scène biblique : la Trinité.” 1945. Signed and numbered “SARLUIS / 18.” Autographed “To Mademoiselle Lasch / affectionate souvenir / Sarluis / 1945” on a piece of paper attached to the back. Image © lotsearch.de. Fair use license. via https://www.lotsearch.de/lot/leonard-sarluis-la-haye-1874-paris-1949-scene-biblique-la-trinite-31032079?perPage=50
"Deux Anges Veillant un prophète."
“Deux Anges Veillant un prophète.” No date. Pastel and black pencil. Signed on the bottom left. Image © findartinfo.com. Fair use license. via http://www.findartinfo.com/english/art-pictures/6/14/0/Pastel/page/3022.html
"La Divine Comédie"
“La Divine Comédie, ” one of a suite of twelve charcoal drawings on paper. No date. Signed. Image © La Gazette Drouot 2019. Fair use license. via https://www.gazette-drouot.com/lots/10118063
Screenshot (90)
“La Divine Comédie, ” one of a suite of twelve charcoal drawings on paper. No date. Signed. Image © La Gazette Drouot 2019. Fair use license. via https://www.gazette-drouot.com/lots/10118063
everystockphoto-381722-h
Illustration for Gaston de Pawlowski’s ” Voyage au pays de la quatrième dimension.” 1923. In the public domain due to age. via http://www.everystockphoto.com/photo.php?imageId=5957280

Many thanks to Monsieur Navaron, @MonsieurNavaron on twitter, for sending me a link to a Sarlius work which gave me the idea for the post.

More flowers, these being of the botanical print sort. From William Curtis’s “The Botanical Magazine,” the first edition which emerged in 1787 with plates by James Sowerby who produced botanical works of his own later. All of these images taken from the website of antiquarian bookseller Simon Beattie.

"Common Passionflower."
“Common Passionflower.” Page 29. Image © 2020 Simon Beattie. Fair use license. via http://simonbeattie.co.uk/blog/archives/4119/
"Purple Rudbeckia." 3.
“Purple Rudbeckia.” 3. Image © 2020 Simon Beattie. Fair use license. via http://simonbeattie.co.uk/blog/archives/4119/
"Persian Iris." 1.
“Persian Iris.” 1. Image © 2020 Simon Beattie. Fair use license. via http://simonbeattie.co.uk/blog/archives/4119/

Illustrations by W. W. Denslow from the first edition of Frank L. Baum’s “The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.” A selection from the Public Domain Review as these just came out of copyright.

"The head shot forward and struck the Scarecrow" (Hammer-head detail). 1900.
“The head shot forward and struck the Scarecrow” (Hammer-head detail). 1900. W. W. Denslow, illustrator. In the public domain due to age. via https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/w-w-denslow-illustrations-wonderful-wizard-of-oz-1900
"She caught Toto by the Ear."
“She caught Toto by the Ear.” 1900. W. W. Denslow, illustrator. In the public domain due to age. via https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/w-w-denslow-illustrations-wonderful-wizard-of-oz-1900
"I am the Witch of the North."
“I am the Witch of the North.” 1900. W. W. Denslow, illustrator. In the public domain due to age. via https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/w-w-denslow-illustrations-wonderful-wizard-of-oz-1900
"You must be a great sorceress."
“You must be a great sorceress.” 1900. W. W. Denslow, illustrator. In the public domain due to age. via https://publicdomainreview.org/collection/w-w-denslow-illustrations-wonderful-wizard-of-oz-1900

More soon. As a child we had a copy of one of the early editions that had these illustrations which I have not seen since.