18th-century people got up to look like the ancients did. Maybe.Neoclassical. Joseph-Benoit Suvée, Belgian/Flemish artist (ca. 1747-1807).

"Cornelia, madre dei Gracchi." 1795.
“Cornelia, madre dei Gracchi.” 1795. Painting. Collection of the Louvre Museum, Paris. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Joseph-Beno%C3%AEt_Suv%C3%A9e_-_Cornelia,_madre_dei_Gracchi.JPG
"Invention of the Art of Drawing." 1791.
“Invention of the Art of Drawing.” 1791. Collection of the Groeninge Museum, Bruges. In the public domain due to age. via http://rijksmuseumamsterdam.blogspot.com/2017/05/the-originof-painting-in.html
"Birth of the Virgin." ca. 1778. Sketch.
“Birth of the Virgin.” ca. 1778. Sketch. Image © WahooArt.org. via https://en.wahooart.com/@@/A2A8FF-Joseph-Benoit-Suv%C3%A9e-Birth-of-the-Virgin-(sketch).
"L'Eté. Troyes." No date.
“L’Eté. Troyes.” No date. In the public domain. via https://www.flickr.com/photos/mazanto/9506376263
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Outdoors with the sun not wanting to peek out. Belgian. Gustav De Smet, painter (1877-1943).The older brother of Leon de Smet.

"Farm and corn field." ca. 1942.
“Farm and cornfield.” ca. 1942. Image © 2018 Blouin Corp. Fair use license. via https://www.blouinartsalesindex.com/auctions/Gustave-de-Smet-7113788/Farm-and-corn-field-1942
"De Palingvisser"(The Eel Fisher). 1900
“De Palingvisser”(The Eel Fisher). 1900. Oil on canvas. Image © 2018 Kloser Contemporary Art. Fair use license. via http://kloserart.com/continuum%252520119/exhibition%252520continuum%252520119/WORKS%2520ON%2520SHOW%2520CONTINUUM%2520119/The%2520Eel%2520Fisher.html
"Wood of Silver Firs." 1911.
“Wood of Silver Firs.” 1911. Image © Auction Zip 2003 – 2019. Fair use license. via https://www.auctionzip.com/auction-lot/Gustave-DE-SMET-1877-1943_46547588D2

Paintings of children trying to have fun when the grownups aren’t looking. Belgian. Franz Verhas, artist (1827-1897). Painted many portraits and genre scenes.

"The Lion." 1874.
“The Lion.” 1874. Oil on canvas. Collection of the the Museum of Fine Arts, Ghent. In the public domain in the United States it was published before January 1, 1924. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Franz_Verhas_(1832-1894)_De_leeuw_(1874)_MSK_Gent_22-11-2015_11-58-03.JPG
"La lecture au salon." 1850-1894.
“La lecture au salon.” 1850-1894. Oil on canvas. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frans_Verhas_-_Reading_in_the_living_room.JPG
"The Master Painter." 1877.
“The Master Painter.” 1877. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Ghent. In the public domain in the United States it was published before January 1, 1924. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jan_Verhas_-_The_master_painter.jpeg
"The Broken Flower Pot." 1876.
“The Broken Flower Pot.” 1876. Lithograph. Image © 2019 – WorthPoint Corporation. Fair use license. via https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/jan-frans-verhas-broken-flower-pot-537812522

Neo-Pompeiian art, these hailing from Belgium. Painted by Pierre Oliver Joseph Coomans who lived from 1816 to 1889. While touring Europe he paid a visit to the excavations at Pompeii which he found most fascinating, something very obvious here.

"Roman Banquet." 1876.
“Roman Banquet.” 1876. Oil on canvas. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Joseph_Coomans_-_Roman_banquet.jpg
"The Last Hour of Pompeii." 19th c.
“The Last Hour of Pompeii.” 19th c. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://www.amazon.com/Pompei-Pierre-Oliver-Joseph-Coomans/dp/B017TFF6FW
"Difficult to choose."
“Difficult to choose.” 19th c. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://iamachild.wordpress.com/category/coomans-p-o-joseph/
"An Afternoon's Amusement."
“An Afternoon’s Amusement.” 19th c. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://www.amazon.com/Afternoons-Amusement-Pierre-Oliver-Coomans/dp/B017T5LHZU

Art from Belgium with something around the edges to give you goosebumps. Symbolist school. Jean Delville, artist (1867-1953).

"The Treasures of Satan." 1895.
“The Treasures of Satan.” 1895. Collection of the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels. Image © 2019 MCH Group | Curiator. Fair use license. via https://curiator.com/art/jean-delville/the-treasures-of-satan
"The Angel of Splendor." 1894.
“The Angel of Splendor.” 1894. Collection of the Royal Museums of Fine Arts of Belgium, Brussels. Fair use license. via https://lightbearerofbeauty.wordpress.com/art/paintings/
"La Méduse." 1893.
“La Méduse.” 1893. Blue Indian ink, crayon, gold paint and colored pencil on yellow paper. Image © Art Institute of Chicago. Fair use license. via https://www.artic.edu/artworks/203868/medusa

Victorian children doing their best to be good until the painter goes home. Mothers and children by Belgian artist Gustave de Jonghe (1829-1893. Starting out with religious and historical subjects he is known for his society portraits and genre pictures.

"Mother with her Young Daughter." 1865.
“Mother with her Young Daughter.” 1865. Oil on panel. Image courtesy Sotheby’s. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gustave_L%C3%A9onard_de_Jonghe_-_Mother_with_her_Young_Daughter.jpg
"Game Time." 1866.
“Game Time.” 1866. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gustave_L%C3%A9onard_de_Jonghe_-_Game_Time.jpg
"Motherly Love." ca. 1860.
“Motherly Love.” ca. 1860. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://pixels.com/featured/motherly-love-gustave-leonard-de-jonghe.html

Art Déco ceramics in brilliant hues designed by Charles Catteau who lived from 1880 to 1966. An industrial designer when industrial design meant something prettier than your computer mouse.

Monumental hand painted cache-pot. 1934.
Monumental hand painted cache-pot. 1934. Charles Catteau, designer for Boch Freres Keramis. Image © 2019 ChateauAntiques. Fair use license. via https://modernism.com/items/4155/decorative-objects-ceramics-other/8772-6376-charles-catteau-art-deco-cache-pot-boch
Hand painted vase. 1927.
Hand painted vase. 1927. Embossed with the number 782. Charles Catteau, designer for Boch Frères. Image © 2019 Pamono GmbH. Fair use license. via https://www.pamono.co.uk/large-art-deco-vase-by-charles-catteau-for-boch-freres-1927
"Elephants" vase with three elephants and stylized palm trees. Early 20th c.
“Elephants” vase with three elephants and stylized palm trees. Early 20th c. Charles Catteau, designer for Boch Frères. Image © decorobject.com. Fair use license. via https://decorobject.com/decorative-objects/vases/vases-home-decor-charles-catteau-for-boch-freres-art-deco-elephants-vase-early-20th-century-f/
Large wall dish with shimmering multicolored floral decoration."
Large wall dish with shimmering multicolored floral decoration. 20th c. Signed under the base “Keramis Made in Belgium” and numbered “D 2072” with a similar model shown on page 705 of Marc Pairon’s “Charles Catteau, Art Deco Ceramics, Made in Belgium.” Charles Catteau, designer. Image © Millon/millon.com. Fair use license. via http://www.millon.com/html/fiche.jsp?id=6780487&np=&lng=fr&npp=150&ordre=&aff=&r=