Illustrations from a 1913 edition of “In Powder and Crinoline” (“The Twelve Dancing Princesses) just waiting to dance into the hearts of little girls everywhere. Kay Nielsen, Danish illustrator (1886-1957).

"The Ship Headed About and Sped Over the Depths of the Sea."
“The Ship Headed About and Sped Over the Depths of the Sea.” Collection of Washington University in Saint Louis. via https://library.wustl.edu/fendi-loves-kay-nielsen/
"Czarina's archery."
“Czarina’s archery.” via http://foromanualidades.facilisimo.com/foros/decoupage/laminas-vintage-antiguas-retro-y-por-el-estilo_684857_504.html
"The Princesses on the way to the dance."
“The Princesses on the way to the dance.” via https://libapps.libraries.uc.edu/liblog/2016/11/enchanting-fairy-tales-dressed-in-powder-and-crinoline/

All works in the public domain in the United States because they were published before January 1, 1924.

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Fans from “Costumes parisiens. Eventails de Paquin d’après” from a 1912 issue of the Parisian fashion magazine ” Journal des Dames et des Modes”. Engraved from drawings that George Barbier and Paul Iribe made for the fashion House of Paquin, you could be chic waving them around at a party anywhere.

Fan #1.
Fan #1 Plate 42 (detail) Image © Diktats.com. Fair use license. via http://www.diktats.com/french/eventails-de-paquin-d-apres-george-barbier-et-paul-iribe-le-journal-des-dames-et-des-modes-costumes-parisiens-1912.html
Fan #2 Plate 42 (detail)
Fan #2 Plate 42 (detail) Image © Edition Originale. Fair use license. via https://www.edition-originale.com/en/prints-engravings-photographs/prints-xxe/-costumes-parisiens-eventails-de-paquin-1912-57647
Fan #3 Plate 42 (detail).
Fan #3 Plate 42 (detail). https://www.edition-originale.com/en/prints-engravings-photographs/prints-xxe/-costumes-parisiens-eventails-de-paquin-1912-57647

Birds to chirp their way into the front parlor by Dutch lithographer and painter Theodorus van Hoytema, or Hoijtema. Living from 1863 to 1917 his bird calendars decorated homes all over the Netherlands.

"The Return of the Stork." 1893.
“The Return of the Stork.” 1893. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via http://msdresen.blogspot.com/2014/05/theo-van-hoytema.html
"Swans in the river." 1898.
“Swans in the river.” 1898. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hoytema-Swans.jpg
"Ducks." Undated.
“Ducks.” Undated. Watercolor. Collection of the Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam. In the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1924. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ducks.jpeg

An envisioning . . . 1910 and Three Kings Day winding down in the house outside Havana . . .

Oh to be here.

Cuba for Christmas and a palm tree covered with glass bells and garlands of berries. The neighbors all with something else but all of them from somewhere else. Grandfather having fled Prussia when everything went crazy in 1848. From Berlin, not Madrid like half the neighborhood.

Midnight mass and enough presents to wrap around the house twice if not three times. Three cases worth from the cousins in London and one from the ones in Saint Petersburg.

No one small needing amusing. A tribe of children, not just two, and enough toys for each one to play with something different every day. Skinned knees from climbing the banyan trees while someone small enough to fit between the roots has a doll tea party under it with frangipani for sofa cushions and poinsettia for plates.

Bookshelf of romances to read through. One about a girl who ends up in Malta and another about someone in Johannesburg. Grandmother’s, they are. Must be a memory thing. Not a single one about anyone who stayed put.

Book put down and the armoire instead. A bit cold and a shawl. But something leaning up in the back with the brown paper they always use. Someone done up as cupid with the little wings. Grandfather’s uncle as a little one, it says on the back.

Funny . . . all those scandals . . .loose women, gambling and who knows what, but before that of course. . .last one on earth to be cupid but no one knew . . .

Prince Boris Nikolayevich Yusupov  as Cupid. ca. 1800.
Prince Boris Nikolayevich Yusupov as Cupid. ca. 1800. Élisabeth Louise Vigée Le Brun, artist (1755-1842). In the public domain. via https://www.myartprints.co.uk/a/regional-art-museum.html&sfl=1&INCLUDE=LIST

Plates from John C. Nimmo’s “The Soft Porcelain of Sevres” which came out in 1892. Helping to keep the Sevres factories busy for decades, it cluttered up a lot of living rooms too. A few extras in the bunch that missed the book, too.

Design for two flower pots. 19th c.
Design for two flower pots. 19th c. French. Graphite, watercolor, gouache and gilt. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. In the public domain. via https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/355639?searchField=All&sortBy=relevance&ft=La+Porcelaine+Tendre+de+S%C3%A8vres&offset=0&rpp=20&pos=9
Chromolithograph. 1890's.
Chromolithograph. 1890’s. In the public domain. via https://www.ebay.it/itm/Chromolitographie-gravure-polychrome-print-Porcelaine-de-Sevres-Garnier-1890/312405457721?hash=item48bcd0fb39:g:cvsAAOSwsqdcJyq9
Chromolithograph. 1892.
Chromolithograph. 1892. Image © The Antiquarium. Artwork in the public domain because of age. via https://www.theantiquarium.com/item/002246/john-c-nimmo-sevres-soft-porcelain
Design for a Jardiniere. 19th c.
Design for a Jardiniere. 19th c. French. Graphite, watercolor, gouache, and gold gilt. Louis-Charles Labbé, designer. Collection of the Metropolitan Museum, New York. In the public domain. via https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/355630?searchField=All&sortBy=relevance&ft=La+Porcelaine+Tendre+de+Sèvres&offset=0&a
Chromolithograph. Plate #9.
Chromolithograph. Plate #9. In the public domain. via https://www.ebay.com/itm/ANTIQUE-1892-Sevres-Soft-Porcelain-GARNIER-Chromolithograph-PRINT-BOOK-PLATE-9-/391041869866

An envisioning . . . 1939 and the house on Long Island.

Oh to be here.

Aunt Lily’s house and the Fourth of July weekend about to arrive. So many cookouts and picnics that no one can even envision a potato not coated in mayonnaise with celery stuck in it.

Cousin after cousin and summer friend. A new apartment each year, almost, but auntie’s house always the same.

The grownups sitting around talking about the stock market and war in Europe.

Not child things. No, children meant to have fun and turn brown in the sun and sit staring at the island off the beach until your eyes feel funny.

Screen door banging, and a path nearly worn in the linoleum back and forth to the refrigerator. Case after case of soda in the back porch and uncle saying he should just get his own coke machine. Funny, says that every summer but he never does. A teasing for otherwise he surely would.

A trip to the store for fireworks and then another at a different store. Father liking to set them off for hours and no one about to sell that many at one time. Buy twenty Catherine wheels and just as many skyrockets if he could.

Someone to row everyone around in the rowboat and another somebody to organize a game of hide and seek with every other boy or girl up and down the beach.

Everyone in their bathing suit and two days in the sand after before anyone has to go home on Sunday. Over then but a postcard from the store at the end of the beach where you can walk in barefoot and walk out with summer. . .the sun shining forever and a day till the end of time . . .who needs more . . .

Beach and lake, South Valley Stream State Park, Long Island, New York. 1930-1945.
Beach and lake, South Valley Stream State Park, Long Island, New York. 1930-1945. Vintage postcard. In the public domain. Tichnor Brothers Collection. via hiddenwatersblog.wordpress.com and https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:5138jn18s

 

Embroidery that goes back and forth through time from the collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. All in the public domain. Two of western origin, the others from Asia.

Ecclesiastical embroidery. Late 17th c.
Ecclesiastical embroidery on velvet. Late 17th c. French. Maker not known. via https://collections.lacma.org/node/246569
Pocketbook. 18th c.
Pocketbook. 18th c. French or Swiss. Silk satin with straw embroidery. via https://collections.lacma.org/node/243942
Table frontal. early 19th c.
Table frontal. early 19th c. Late Qing dynasty, Chinese. Silk and metallic thread embroidery on silk satin. via https://collections.lacma.org/node/209113
Kimono fragment with scattered triangles. Edo period, Japan (1615-1868).
Kimono fragment with scattered triangles. Edo period, Japan (1615-1868). Silk satin with wrapped silk embroidery. via https://collections.lacma.org/node/224943
Pidan hol (hanging or cover). 19th c.
Pidan hol (hanging or cover). 19th c. Cambodian. Silk. Khmer people, Kampot province, makers. via https://collections.lacma.org/node/179104