Church silver and gold for Christmas Eve, and of the most spectacular kind. Some actual Gothic and some Gothic Revival, but all with more whistles and bells than most.

Chalice. 1608 with later restorations.
Chalice. 1608 with later restorations. Westphalian (German). Gold, enamel and jewels. Probably made by Otto Meier (active 1604–21). In the public domain. via https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/193477?pos=50&rpp=30&pg=2&ft=chalice
Wanamaker cross. First used in 1922.
Wanamaker cross. First used in 1922. Processional cross. Ivory, silver gilt and diamond. Walter Stoye, designer. Barkentin & Krall, maker. Collection of Westminster Abbey, London. Image © Westminster Abbey. via https://www.westminster-abbey.org/worship-music/worship-at-the-abbey/processional-crosses/
Chalice and paten. ca. 1867-1873.
Chalice and paten. ca. 1867-1873. Barkentin and Krall, maker. Silver, parcel gilt, semi-precious stones and pearls. In the public domain in the United States as the makers have been dead over 70 years. via https://www.liturgicalartsjournal.com/2018/03/chalice-by-barkentin-and-krall.html
Saint Bernard chalice. 1390's. German. Gold.
Saint Bernard chalice. 1390’s. German. Gold. Maker not known. In the public domain. via https://www.scross.co.za/2017/07/why-the-chalice/
Chalice. 1856-1857.
Chalice. 1856-1857. Silver with gilding set with semi-precious stones. William Butterfield, designer. John Kent, maker. © Victoria and Albert Museum, London. via http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O78077/chalice-william-butterfield/
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