Botanical pictures with more than a whiff of a lei and a tropical sea. Taken from Mrs. Francis Sinclair’s “Indigenous flowers of the Hawaiian islands” which was published in London in 1885.

"Ohai." Page 105.
“Ohai.” Page 105. Collection of the National Agricultural Library, United States Department of Agriculture. In the public domain due to age. https://archive.org/details/CAT11021591/page/n105
"Kolokolo-Kuahiwi. Page 126.
“Kolokolo-Kuahiwi. Page 126. Collection of the National Agricultural Library, United States Department of Agriculture. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/CAT11021591/page/n126
"Papala." Page 194.
“Papala.” Page 194. Collection of the National Agricultural Library, United States Department of Agriculture. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/CAT11021591/page/n194
"Ohia-AI." Page 182.
“Ohia-AI.” Page 182.Collection of the National Agricultural Library, United States Department of Agriculture. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/CAT11021591/page/n182
"Ieie." Page 30.
“Ieie.” Page 30. Collection of the National Agricultural Library, United States Department of Agriculture. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/CAT11021591/page/n30
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An envisioning . . . 1932 and a cocktail on the veranda at the officer’s club outside Honolulu.

Oh to be there.

Hawaii and the breeze wandering through the palm trees. Winter to spend and spring back home in New York. Cuba maybe next year but not this. No, someone’s cousin stationed at Pearl Harbor and dinner following dinner along with gin and tonics that never end.

Ballroom to dance in upstairs and men in white uniforms everywhere. Waiters with their trays, men mowing the lawn and gentlemen to dine and dance with.

A treat. Many places just as pretty but this one the old Haleiwa Hotel with memories of honeymooning from before the war. Flying boat over from Los Angeles faster than the old steamers were and just as exciting.  The lobby different what with no desk clerk but the same potted palms set around and fans overhead.

A joy. Picture of the place colored up in the old days lying on a table and somehow sneaking into one’s handbag. . . not nice but what can one do . . . not there forever and the husband gone three years later. . .something to keep in the jewelry box where no one ever dies.

Haleiwa Hotel on Oahu in its final reuse as a World War II officer's club.
Haleiwa Hotel on Oahu in its final reuse as a World War II officer’s club. Built in 1899 and demolished in the 1950’s. Hand tinted photograph. via Facebook.

Paintings of erupting Hawaiian volcanoes that look spookier than last summer’s pictures . . .the fire goddess must have been having a major tantrum . . Jules Tavernier, French artist (1844-1889). Member of the Hawaiian Volcano School.

Untitled (Dripping Lava). 1886.
Untitled (Dripping Lava). 1886. Oil on canvas. Collection of the National Park Service, Volcanoes National Park. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%27Untitled_(Dripping_Lava)%27_by_Jules_Tavernier,_1886,_oil.jpg.
"Kīlauea Caldera, Sandwich Islands." 1886.
“Kīlauea Caldera, Sandwich Islands.” 1886. Oil on canvas. Photo credit: wmpearl. Collection of the San Diego Museum of Art. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Kilauea_Caldera,_Sandwich_Islands_by_Jules_Tavernier,_San_Diego_Museum_of_Art.JPG.
"Full Moon over Kilauea." 1887.
“Full Moon over Kilauea.” 1887. Oil on canvas. Location not given. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jules_Tavernier%27s_painting_%27Full_Moon_over_Kilauea%27,_1887.jpg.
"Le Volcan Kilauea." 1887
“Le Volcan Kilauea.” 1887. Oil on canvas. Location not available. via https://leprincelointain.blogspot.com/2016/12/jules-tavernier-1844-1889-le-volcan.html.
"Volcano, Kilauea, Island of Hawaii." 1885.
“Volcano, Kilauea, Island of Hawaii.” 1885. Gouache and pastel on paper. Collection of the National Park Service, Volcanoes National Park. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:%27Volcano,_Kilauea,_Island_of_Hawaii%27_by_Jules_Tavernier,_1885,_gouache_and_pastel_.jpg

All artworks in the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over a hundred years.