Walking cane handles. Antique or vintage and not that boring plastic kind of thing. All of these from a current Toovey’s Auctions catalogue.

Hardwood walking cane with spherical ivory handle and silver collar. 1919. Made in London by W.B. Image © Toovey’s 2017-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.tooveys.com/lots/447025/an-early-20th-century-hardwood-walking-cane-with-spherical-ivory-handle-and-silver-collar
Malacca walking cane, the ivory handle being finely carved as a dog’s head with inset amber glass eyes and the shaft with a plaque, detailed “Roma.” 19th c. Maker not known. Image © Toovey’s 2017-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.tooveys.com/lots/447027/a-19th-century-malacca-walking-cane
Ebonized walking cane, the spherical banded agate handle having a gilt metal collar. Late 19th c. Image © Toovey’s 2017-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.tooveys.com/lots/447029/a-late-19th-century-ebonized-walking-cane
Pair of walking canes. The one on the left dating to the late 19th century, the ivory and grown resin handle detailed “Jose Torres Alarcon.” Cane on the right is Malacca with an ivory handle and silver collar, 19th c. Image © Toovey’s 2017-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.tooveys.com/lots/447032/a-late-19th-century-walking-cane
Palmwood walking came with a molded tortoiseshell handle with gilt metal mount and collar, engraved “D. Livingston from Saint Columbia Kirk Session.” Late 19th c. Image © Toovey’s 2017-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.tooveys.com/lots/447033/a-late-19th-century-palmwood-walking-cane

Please note that several of these are ivory and another is tortoiseshell. I think these are all right to use because they are all 19th century, antique in other words. They don’t carve walking cane handles that look like these today. If this bothers you about the ivory and tortoiseshell just look at another post. If they were of recent manufacture I wouldn’t dream of using them.