Paintings of fireworks bursting so close you can smell the gunpowder. From various places and times . . . but all bright. . . what else could a skyrocket be?

1024px-Middleton_Manigault_-_The_Rocket_(1909)
“The Rocket.” 1909. American. Oil on canvas. Edward Middleton Manigault, artist (1887-1922). Collection of the Columbus Museum of Art. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead longer than 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Middleton_Manigault_-_The_Rocket_(1909).jpg.
"Fireworks." 1927.
“Fireworks.” 1927. Japanese. Painting. Harue Koga, artist (1895-1933). In the public domain in Japan and the United States due to age. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hkfireworks.jpg.
"Il Fuoco d'Artificio." 1887.
“il Fuoco d’Artificio.” 1887. Belgian. Painting. James Ensor, artist (1860-1949). Collection of the Albright-Knox Gallery. Cc Licence 3.0. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:James_ensor,_il_fuoco_d%27artificio,_1887.jpg.
"Fireworks over Castel Sant'Angelo in Rome." 1775.
“Fireworks over Castel Sant’Angelo in Rome.” 1775. Brandenburg/Italy. Gouache. Jakob Philipp Hackert, artist (1737-1807). Collection of the Graphische Sammlungen. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hackert,_Feuerwerk_auf_der_Engelsburg_in_Rom,_1775.jpg.
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