Egg cruets. Yes, the Victorians had specialized tableware for everything imaginable. But still. . . much prettier than those ceramic bluebird looking things in Walmart.

Four egg cruet. Basket weave with a shaped base that has a beaded rim with coordinating folding handle. Four removable egg cups and four egg spoons. ca. 1890-1910. English, made in London. Silver plate. G. R. Collis and Company. maker. Maker’s marks: fully marked on the underside for G. R. Collis and Company. Image © 1stDibs.com, Inc. 2021. Fair use license. via https://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/dining-entertaining/sheffield-silverplate/quality-antique-silver-plated-four-egg-cruet-gr-collis-london/id-f_21469492/
.”Cooking Tripod” novelty egg cruet in the form of a lashed cooking tripod, with a silver rope fastening the egg cups in place and a spoon attached to each leg. 1894. Victorian. English, made in Sheffield. Sterling silver. Maker mark’s: Hallmarked in Sheffield in 1894 by John Round and Son, Ltd. Image © 1stDibs.com, Inc. 2021. Fair use license. via https://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/dining-entertaining/sterling-silver/victorian-novelty-cooking-tripod-sterling-silver-egg-cruet-from-1894/id-f_18886372/?gclid=CjwKCAiA1eKBBhBZEiwAX3gql6inqs0WZR86XOiIifLPiTr1H_weT5MUtSh0jwGoT9NJaoog84D5dRoC1pQQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=a
Sterling silver egg cruet with silver gilt egg cups that stand on a hexagonal star point frame with floral engraving throughout. The frame having decorative scroll feet and a heart shaped handle. 1845. Gothic Revival. Victorian. Made in London, England. Sterling silver and silver gilt. Joseph Angell and Son, maker. Maker’s marks: hallmarked in London in 1845 for Joseph Angell and Son. Image © 1stDibs.com, Inc. 2021. Fair use license. via https://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/dining-entertaining/sterling-silver/gothic-revival-antique-sterling-silver-egg-cruet-hallmarked-1845/id-f_16494952/?gclid=CjwKCAiA1eKBBhBZEiwAX3gql1d8N1T5AE85QEvVzGt_n5fwREtnt7b0G44G4UPcLvjURR5K1

Sterling silver bowls, all of them on the big end of things. British. Edward Barnard and Sons, maker. Not around anymore but they created the the Lily font that was commissioned by Queen Victoria for the christening of her first born in 1840 that has been used by the royal family ever since.

Lily font. Christening font with a bowl in the form of an expanded flower with a border of water-lilies and leaves; stem formed of leaves, flanked at the base by three seated cherubs playing lyres upon a circular plinth with coats of arms and supporters.1840-1841. English. Silver-gilt. Commissioned by Queen Victoria. Image © Royal Collection Trust. Fair use license. via https://www.rct.uk/collection/31741/the-lily-font
Two-handled bowl with cylindrical ivory handles, the rim with applied notched border. 1937. Art Deco. English. Silver. Retail stamp for Harrods. Sold by Bonham’s on 2018. Image .© Purely Silver 2006 – 2020. Fair use license. via https://purelysilver.info/edward-barnard-sons/
Bowl with decorations applied by a very precise hand. 1873. English. Silver. Provided with a multitude of hallmarks. Image © 2021 Catawiki. Fair use license. via https://www.catawiki.com/l/19139955-silver-bowl-barnard-sons-ltd-london-1873

Portraits of birds from a little while ago. Scottish. Archibald Thorburn, painter. Living from 1860 to 1935, Thorburn specialized in paintings of wildlife, especially Scottish birds. Son of Robert Thorburn who painted miniatures for Queen Victoria.

“Peacock and Peacock Butterfly.” 1917. Scottish. Signed and dated on the bottom right. Image source: Bonham’s. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 80 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Archibald_Thorburn,_Peacock_and_Peacock_Butterfly,_At_87.5_x_111.5cm._Bonhams..jpg
 
“Luscinia luscinia.” 1913. Scottish. Oil on canvas. Image source “British birds.” Archibald Thorburn. Volume. I. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Luscinia_luscinia._Archibald_Thorburn.png
“Cock and hen pheasant in the undergrowth.” 1927. Scottish. Pencil and watercolor, with gum arabic, heightened with touches of bodycolor. Signed and dated signed and dated “A. Thorburn/1927′: on the lower left. Image source: Christies. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Archibald_Thorburn05a.jpg

Portraits of British women and girls painted by Scottish artist Thomas Martine Ronaldson (1881–1942).

“Summer.” 1928. Scottish. Signed on the lower right. Artwork in the public domain due to age. via https://www.reddit.com/r/museum/comments/6bmck9/thomas_martine_ronaldson_summer_1928/
Anna Katrina Zinkeisen. ca. 1924. Scottish. Oil on canvas. Collections of and © National Galleries of Scotland, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art. Fair use license. via https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/anna-katrina-zinkeisen-214403
“Lesley in the Studio/The Painter’s Daughter.” 1923. Oil on canvas. Scottish. Photo credit, collections and © Falmouth Art Gallery. Fair use license. via https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/lesley-in-the-studio-14625

Fairies in flight. English. Walter Jenks Morgan, artist. Living from 1847 to 1924, he studied at the Birmingham School of Art. A member of the Birmingham Art Circle.

“A Fairy Ring.” Undated. Signed on the lower right. In the public domain due to age. via https://www.flickr.com/photos/sofi01/11406300036/
“Here I am to Rescue You.” Undated. Signed on the lower right. In the public domain due to age. via https://fineartamerica.com/featured/here-i-am-to-rescue-walter-jenks-morgan.html
“Where Rural Fays and Fairies Dwell.: ca. 1900. Signed on the lower right. In the public domain due to age. via https://fineartamerica.com/featured/where-rural-fays-and-fairies-dwell-walter-jenks-morgan.html

More tropical fish taken from John Whitchurch Bennett’s 1830 work “A selection from the most remarkable and interesting of the fishes found on the coast of Ceylon.” Some of the first images of tropical fish published in London. These plates are from the 1834 edition.

Chaetodon vespertilio.” Page 31. Collections of the Smithsonian Libraries. Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/selectionfrommo00benn/page/n31/mode/1up
:\”Chaetodon vagabundus.” Page 40. Collections of the Smithsonian Libraries. Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/selectionfrommo00benn/page/n39/mode/1up
Scorpaena miles.” Page 48. Collections of the Smithsonian Libraries. Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/selectionfrommo00benn/page/n48/mode/1up
Balistes aculeatus viridis/” Page 52. Collections of the Smithsonian Libraries. Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/selectionfrommo00benn/page/n51/mode/1up
Sparus Decussatus.” Page 68. Collections of the Smithsonian Libraries. Biodiversity Heritage Library, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/selectionfrommo00benn/page/n68/mode/1up

Aspirational decor to spruce up your home for when the Prince Regent stops by. Illustrations from the 1816 work by H. Repton, Esquire and his son J. Adey Repton , F.A.S, “Fragments on the theory and practice of landscape gardening : including some remarks on Grecian and Gothic architecture.” Published in London.

“Window at Barningham.” Page 75. Collections of the University of Wisconsin. Artwork in the public domain due to age. via https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/ARNROAEXKQQ7R38Y/pages/ACB3R7B4CWXU3F8J
“Window at Barningham.” Page 76. Collections of the University of Wisconsin. Artwork in the public domain due to age. via https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/ARNROAEXKQQ7R38Y/pages/AAO7SHRC5YAGOK8J
“Barningham Hall, Norfolk/. J. T. Mott Esquire.” (stairhall detail). Page 78. Collections of the University of Wisconsin. Artwork itself in the public domain due to age. via https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/ARNROAEXKQQ7R38Y/pages/ABO74KVBEQUXAP8U
Interior with chairs with red upholstery.(upper image) Page 113. Collections of the University of Wisconsin. Artwork in the public domain due to age. via https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/ARNROAEXKQQ7R38Y/pages/AGO5PWJ3Q47FA78R
Interior with bookcases. Page 113. Collections of the University of Wisconsin. Artwork in the public domain due to age. via https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/ARNROAEXKQQ7R38Y/pages/AGO5PWJ3Q47FA78R
“The Vinery.” Page 210. Collections of the University of Wisconsin. Artwork in the public domain due to age. via https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/ARNROAEXKQQ7R38Y/pages/AONVN57XL7RQWE8L
“The Rosary at Ashridge.” Page 233, Collections of the University of Wisconsin. Artwork itself in the public domain due to age. via https://search.library.wisc.edu/digital/ARNROAEXKQQ7R38Y/pages/AQK27H2O2PZW5D8K

Crystal and ormolu centerpieces. Tableware to live up to instead of the other way around. On the other hand, should the empress come to dinner you’ll be all set.

Crystal and cast ormolu epergne with a sphinx supporting each corner, reflecting the fascination with things Ancient Egyptian brought about by the Napoleonic campaigns there. Scrolling foliate arms that raise four antique cranberry glass dishes. 1805. Regency. Made in England. Crafted after a design by architect Charles Heathcote Tatham with a motif originally created in 1801 for Tatham’s major patron, the 5th Earl of Carlisle with the design for the base used as an illustration in “Design for Ornamental Plate” with the captioning “A Piece of Plate designed and executed in Silver for the Earl of Carlisle in the year 1801.” Maker not known. Image via © 1stdibs.com, Inc. 2021. Fair use license. via https://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/dining-entertaining/centerpieces/regency-crystal-ormolu-epergne/id-f_22325322/
French Empire epergne with ormolu and green crystal cut glass. Mid 19th c. French. Maker not known. Image © Canonbury Antiques – Redwell Hill Farm. Fair use license. via https://canonburyantiques.com/p/French-Glass-Epergne-Dish—Ormolu-Louis-XV-Crystal-1567586936/
Ormolu mounted floral epergne. Raised leopard paw feet supporting the main ring. Flat diamond cut glass posy vases with scalloped rims, the center supporting a larger vase cut in the same manner. 1870-1879. British. F & C Osler, maker. Maker’s marks: metalwork stamped “OSLER”. Image via © 1stdibs.com, Inc. Fair use license. via https://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/decorative-objects/vases-vessels/planters-cachepots-jardinieres/ormolu-mounted-flower-epergne-fc-osler/id-f_12986841/?gclid=CjwKCAiA65iBBhB-EiwAW253WzGNPIarxD9Lg3Gwv_WEc0EfdSItH9azPEy46CkEpAVW

Ormolu and cut crystal four-piece table garniture, comprising two centerpieces and a pair of candle holders. Each centerpiece surmounted by a figure of Minerva, flanked by a pair of female busts and central Apollo mask, above two pheasants flaked to each side with a circular dish raised on lion monopodia. The candle-holders being en sute. 1875-1900. Made in Paris, France. Baccarat, maker. Maker’s marks: stamped with a Baccarat cachet under the removable crystal dishes. Image © Christie’s 2021. Fair use license. via https://www.christies.com/en/lot/lot-5937639

Antique cow creamers in various materials, one with its own calf and another with its own fly.

Creamer realistically modeled in the form of a cow. Plain body embellished with details reproducing the fine details of the cow’s facial and anatomical features, including a hinged cover surmounted with an impressive cast and applied finial realistically modeled as a fly. Loop handle modeled as a cow’s tail. 1898. Victorian. English, made in London. Cast silver. Maurice Freeman, maker. Maker’s marks: full hallmarks struck to the underside and part hallmarks struck to the interior of the cover. Image © 1stdibs.com, Inc. 2021. Fair use license. via https://www.1stdibs.com/furniture/dining-entertaining/serving-pieces/1898-antique-victorian-sterling-silver-cow-creamer/id-f_19027152/
Whieldon-type cow and calf creamer with cover. Rectangular scalloped shaped base with a floral knob. 1760s. British. Ceramic. Label for Boswell and Ward, London on the underside. Image © polkadotantiques.com. Fair use license. via http://www.polkadotantiques.com/cow-creamers-1

 Cow creamer with simple figuring and a naive expressive face. The flap with a bee on the cow’s back lifts to fill the jug with cream which is poured out of the cow’s mouth. ca. 1920. Continental, probably made in the Netherlands. Silver. Maker’s marks: marked on the body underneath the flap with continental maker’s marks. Image © Wax Antiques, London. Fair use license. via https://www.waxantiques.com/antique-continental-silver-cow-creamer.html
Cow creamer, ceramic with a floral pattern and horns which are pointing upwards and out. ca. 1900. Possibly European. No marks. Image © Cynthia Findlay Antiques, Toronto. Fair use license. via https://www.cynthiafindlay.com/decor-and-dining/collectibles/cow-creamers/antique-cow-creamer.html

Animals, mostly dogs but a zebra too. Not sure the zebra was a pet, though. English. Christopher Wood, painter. Living from 1901 to 1930, he trained at the Académie Julian in Paris.

“Zebra and Parachute.” 1930. English. Oil on canvas. Collections of the Tate Galleries, London. Cc0 License. 3.0. via https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/wood-zebra-and-parachute-t12038

“China Dogs in a Saint Ives Window.” 1926. English. In the public domain due to age. via https://www.instagram.com/p/BrCazxHnYMv/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=1jfgdh1k7ljfm
“The Barber’s Family.” 1927. English. Oil on canvas laid on board. Signed and dated on the lower right. Image © 2021 The Redfern Gallery, Fair use license. via https://www.redfern-gallery.com/artists/76-christopher-wood/works/10160/