Beautiful textiles produced by Alexander Morton (1844-1923). Starting out selling muslins created in weavers’ homes, Morton established his own factory and produced fabrics with designs he bought from the Silver Studio and Bailie Scott, amongst others. His fabrics were carried by Liberty of London. Morton was born in Scotland but his factories were in Ireland.

Cotton textile with a design inspired by Sardinian peasant embroideries. 1926. British. Cotton in a plain weave with brocading in chenille yarns. Alexander Morton, designer. Image © Cooper Hewitt Museum. Fair use license. via https://collection.cooperhewitt.org/objects/18343651/
Wool and silk woven furnishing fabric, double cloth with silk pockets in an Italian style with floral and leaf tracery. ca. 1891. British. Alexander Morton and Company, maker. Courtaulds Design Library Collections, Victoria and Albert Museum. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2021. Fair use license. via https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O1434621/furnishing-fabric-alexander-morton/
Furnishing fabric woven with a tapestry effect with peacocks, flowers, tulips, vines, and leaves. 1890-1900. British. Wool and cotton. Alexander Morton and Company, maker. Courtaulds Design Library Collections, Victoria and Albert Museum. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2021. Fair use license. via https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O1434568/furnishing-fabric-alexander-morton/

Visions of an earlier Greece back in 1801 to 1806, back when it was part of the Ottoman Empire. Illustrative plates from Volume I of Edward Dodwell’s 1819 work “A Classical and topographical tour through Greece.” Published in London.

“Sacred well at Patra.” Page 150. British. From a drawing by S. Pomardi. Smith, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/classicaltopogra01dodw/page/n150/mode/1up
“Drawbridge at Corfu.” Page 63. British. From a drawing by S. Pomardi. Charles Heath, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/classicaltopogra01dodw/page/n63/mode/1up
“Zakunthos.” Page 113. British. From a drawing by S. Pomardi. William Lizars, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/classicaltopogra01dodw/page/n113/mode/1up

“Salona.” Page 179. British. After a drawing by Edward Dodwell. Radcliffe, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/classicaltopogra01dodw/page/n179/mode/1up

Off on a holiday to various places with British painter Edward Henry Holder (1847-1922).

“Rievaulx Abbey, from the South.” 1880. British. Oil on canvas. Collectios of and photographed by the York Art Gallery. In the public domain. via https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/rievaulx-abbey-from-the-south-8412
“The Gorge and Palm Grove, Victoria Falls.” Undated but probably painted towards the end of his career when he visited South Africa. He exhibited a similar work in 1917 at the Royal Academy under the title “The Rainbow Falls: Victoria Falls on the Zambesi, Rhodesia.” British. Oil on canvas. SIgned “E. Henry Holder” on the lower right. Inscribed with the title on the stretcher verso.  Image © Bonhams 2001-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/15349/lot/17/
“Hackness Wood, near Scarborough.” 1880. British. Oil on canvas. Oil on canvas. Collectios of and photographed by the York Art Gallery. In the public domain. via https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/hackness-wood-near-scarborough-8416

Mirror frames that were old in 1836, one coming with its own furniture. Not your average Ikea kind of thing. Plates from Samuel Rush Meyrick’s “Specimens of Ancient Furniture.” Published in London by William Pickering. The illustrations drawn by Henry Shaw from existing authorities.

“Looking glass, of the time of Queen Elizabeth, in the possession of Sir Samuel Meyrick, Goodrich Court, Hertfordshire.” Page 26. Drawn and engraved by Henry Shaw. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/specimensofancie00meyr/page/26/mode/1up
“French looking glass, from Willimen’s ‘Monuments français inédits.” Page 39. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/specimensofancie00meyr/page/n39/mode/1up
“Silver furniture, at Knole Park, a seat of the Countess of Plymouth, date the time of James II.” page 41. Drawn and engraved by Henry Shaw. Collections of and digitalized by the Getty Research Institute. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/specimensofancie00meyr/page/n41/mode/1up

Embroidery patterns from the “Lady’s Magazine.” Run up a veil on your sewing machine with these and look like Charlotte, Princess Royal.

“New and Elegant Patterns for Children’s Caps,” engraved for the Lady’s Magazine. 1810. British, published in London. Special Collections and Archives, Cardiff University. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://archive.org/details/LMG00009
“New and Elegant Pattern for a Veil or Bottom of a Dress,” engraved for the Lady’s Magazine. 1810. British, published in London. Special Collections and Archives, Cardiff University. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://archive.org/details/LMG00006

“An Elegant New Pattern for the Head-piece and Border of a Cap,” engraved for the Lady’s Magazine. 1812. British, published in London. Special Collections and Archives, Cardiff University. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://archive.org/details/LMG00016
New Pattern for a Frill and Ruff,” engraved for the Lady’s Magazine. 1812. Published in London, England.  Special Collections and Archives, Cardiff University. Cc0 License 4.0. via https://archive.org/details/LMG00023

Fish, birds and plants, plates from Mark Catesby’s two volume 1754 folio “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants.” Second edition.

“Suillus” (?). Image from “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French.” Image © 2021 Sotheby’s. Fair use license. via https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/auction/2021/fine-books-and-manuscripts-2/catesby-mark-the-most-famous-colorplate-book-of
“Turdus Rhomboidalis” (upper) and “Turdus” (lower image). Image from “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French.” Image © 2021 Sotheby’s. Fair use license. via https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/auction/2021/fine-books-and-manuscripts-2/catesby-mark-the-most-famous-colorplate-book-of
“Cancer clieîis crafsifsimis.” Image from “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French.” Image © 2021 Sotheby’s. Fair use license. via https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/auction/2021/fine-books-and-manuscripts-2/catesby-mark-the-most-famous-colorplate-book-of
“Live oak” (left) and the large red crested woodpecker (right).” Image from “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French.” Image © 2021 Sotheby’s. Fair use license. via https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/auction/2021/fine-books-and-manuscripts-2/catesby-mark-the-most-famous-colorplate-book-of
“Ardea (heron)” and “Lobelia.” Image from “The Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants; particularly, those not hitherto described, or incorrectly figured by former authors, with their descriptions in English and French.” Image © 2021 Sotheby’s. Fair use license. via https://www.sothebys.com/en/buy/auction/2021/fine-books-and-manuscripts-2/catesby-mark-the-most-famous-colorplate-book-of

Exotic butterflies at mid century, the 19th century that is. Just as beautiful as they are now and I hope none of these are now extinct. Taken from W. C. Hewitson’s 1856 work “Illustrations of new species of exotic butterflies: selected chiefly from the collections of W. Wilson Saunders and William C. Hewitson.” All of these plates having been printed by Hullmandel & Walton.

“Papilionidae: ornithoptera and papilio: Ornithoptera Brookeana Wallace and Papilio idaeoides gray.” Page 14. W. C. Hewitson del et Lithograph 1855. Hullmandel & Walton, printers. Collections of and digitalized by the Smithsonian Libraries. In the public domain due to age. via https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/46120#page/14/mode/1up
” Papilionidae: 3,4; Papilio dioxippus. 5; Papilio dioxippus. 6. Papilio Euryleon.” Page 18. W. C. Hewitson del et Lith 1855. Hullmandel & Walton, printer. Collections of and digitalized by the Smithsonian Libraries. In the public domain due to age. via https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/46120#page/18/mode/1up
” Papilionidae: Papilio III; 7. Papilio Wallace; 8. Papilio Onesimus.” W. C. Hewitson del et Lith 1855. Hullmandel & Walton, printers. Collections of and digitalized by the Smithsonian Libraries. In the public domain due to age. via https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/46120#page/22/mode/1up

Plates of Victorian birds, taken from George Robert Gray’s “The genera of birds : comprising their generic characters, a notice of the habits of each genus, and an extensive list of species referred to their several genera” which was issued in parts between 1844 and 1849. Illustrated by D. W. Mitchell and published in London.

“Gypaetinae: Gypaetus barbatus (Linn.)” Page 26, plate 1. Hullmandel and Walton, printers. Collections of and digitalized by the Smithsonian Libraries. In the public domain. via https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/123658#page/26/mode/1up
“Polyborinae: milvago chimango (Vielle).” Page 46, Plate 5. Hullmandel and Walton, printers. Collections of and digitalized by the Smithsonian Institution. In the public domain due to age. via https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/123658#page/46/mode/1up
“Aquilinae: Circaetus holospilus (Vig.).” Page 60, Plate 7. Hullmandel and Walton, printers. Collections of and digitalized by the Smithsonian Institutions. In the public domain due to age. via https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/123658#page/60/mode/1up
“Milvinae: Gamsonyx swainsonii (Vig,).” Page 80, Plate 9. Hullmandel and Walton, printers. Collections of and digitalized by the Smithsonian Institutions. In the public domain due to age. via https://www.biodiversitylibrary.org/item/123658#page/80/mode/1up

Designs to fancy up everything. Why live boring if you can use these? Taken from Samuel Leith’s work “The Tradesman’s Book of ornamental Designs” which was published in London in 1847.

Title page. Page 3. Collections of the Clark Art Institute Library. Digitalizing federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/tradesmansbookof00leit/page/n3/mode/1up?view=theater
“Iron Work.” Page 7. Collections of the Clark Art Institute Library. Digitalizing federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/tradesmansbookof00leit/page/n7/mode/1up?view=theater
“Flemish.” Page 11. Collections of the Clark Art Institute Library. Digitalizing federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/tradesmansbookof00leit/page/n11/mode/1up?view=theater
‘Italian: from a rare etching by Guido Reni after Lucas Cambiaso.” Page 13. Collections of the Clark Art Institute Library. Digitalizing federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/tradesmansbookof00leit/page/n13/mode/1up?view=theater

Make your automobile smile. Buy one of these chromed Art Deco mascots for it. All of these from a recent Bonham’s auction.

“Stork” mascot in chromed metal, based on the famous design by Francois Bazin. Mounted on a period radiator cap. 1935. Maker not shown. Image © Bonhams 2001-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/27140/lot/49/?category=list&length=12&page=5
“Serpent” mascot in nickel plated bronze, on a chromed locking radiator cap. 1920s. French. J. A. Bebin, maker. Image © Bonhams 2001-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/27140/lot/54/?category=list&length=12&page=5
“Lady water-skier” mascot in chrome plated die-cast metal, mounted on a radiator cap. 1930s. American, made in Chicago by Krone and Sebek. Image  © Bonhams 2001-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/27140/lot/55/?category=list&length=12&page=5
Automobile mascot modeled as a winged nymph in the nude holding the chains of an aquaplane board. Chrome plated die-cast alloy mounted on a radiator cap. 1930s. British. Maker not given. Image © Bonhams 2001-2021. Fair use license. via https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/27140/lot/56/?category=list&length=12&page=5