Tulips and carnations and a conservatory in air. Flower paintings so real you could almost bury your nose and breathe their scent. Flemish artist Peter Frans Casteels. Late 17th century.

"Flowers in a Stone Urn." After 1690.
“Flowers in a Stone Urn.” After 1690. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead longer than 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Peter_Frans_Casteels_-_Flowers_in_a_Stone_Urn_2.jpg
"Vase of Flowers on a Ledge." After 1690.
“Vase of Flowers on a Ledge.” After 1690. Collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Budapest. In the public domain in the United States because the artist has been dead over 70 years. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Peter_Frans_Casteels_-_Flowers_in_a_Stone_Urn.jpg
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Three princesses just slightly overdressed (and their pets).

Archduchess Maria Teresa of Austria (and her pet bird) 1771.
Archduchess Maria Teresa of Austria. 1771. Niece of the slightly more famous Marie Antoinette. Anton Raphael Mengs, artist. Image in the public domain. via commons.wikimedia.org.
Unknown Polish princess of the Vasa dynasty in Spanish costume (and her dog). ca. 1644.
Unknown Polish princess of the Vasa dynasty in Spanish costume. ca 1644. Peeter Danckers de Rij, artist. Artwork in the public domain. via commons.wikimedia.org.
Carlota Joaquina de Bourbon, Queen of Portugal and Princess of Spain. 1785.
Carlota Joaquina de Bourbon, Queen of Portugal and Princess of Spain. 1785. Mariano Salvador Maella, artist. Collection of the Prado National Museum. Artwork in the public domain. via commons.wikimedia.org.