Animals in India. Taken from Captain Thomas Williamson and Samuel Howitt’s “Oriental Field Sports” which was printed in London in 1807.

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Elephants. Plate 9, page 169. Collections of the Hathi Trust Digital Library. In the public domain due to age. via https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433003231481&view=1up&seq=169
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Tiger. Plate 12, page 227. Collections of the Hathi Trust Digital Library. In the public domain due to age. via https://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=nyp.33433003231481&view=1up&seq=227&size=125

An India that’s a hop, skip, and jump away. Plates from Robert Montgomery Martin’s 1858 work about India. Martin wrote several books dealing with various parts of the British Empire.

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“Mohuna, near Deobun.” Page 23. W. J. Cook, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/indianempireitsh02mart/page/n23/mode/2up
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“The Choor Mountains,” drawn from nature by G. F. White. Page 27. J. Tingle, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/indianempireitsh02mart/page/n27/mode/2up
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“Gungootree, the Sacred Source of the Ganges,” drawn from nature by G. F. White. Page 30. J. H. Kernot, engraver. Collections of and digitalized by the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/indianempireitsh02mart/page/n29/mode/2up

Engravings of an India that isn’t coming back. Plates from Robert Montgomery Martin’s 1858 work about India which has letterpress descriptions written by Emily (Emma) Roberts. Martin wrote several books dealing with various parts of the British Empire.

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“Delhi – Showing the Entrance to the Palace.” After a sketch by Captain R. Elliot RN. Page 7. Collections of and digitalized by the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/indianempireitsh02mart/page/n7/mode/2up
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“View of Cawnpore from the River.” Engraved after a drawing by C. Mottram. Page 11. Collections of and digitalized by the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/indianempireitsh02mart/page/n11/mode/2up
this one
“View of Sassoor, in the Deccan, Southeast of Poonah: The Walled Building to the Right is a Fortified Palace, and in 1818, its Garrison held out against a division of the British Army.” Page 12. Collections of and digitalized by the Robarts Library at the University of Toronto. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/indianempireitsh02mart/page/n11/mode/2up

Dreams of an India that isn’t coming back. Oils and aquatints by English landscape painter Thomas Daniell RA. Living from 1749 to 1840, he spent seven years painting in India.

"Jami Masjid, Delhi." 1811.
“Jami Masjid, Delhi.” 1811. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Yale Museum for British Art, New Haven. In the public domain in the United States because it was published before January 1, 1924. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Thomas_Daniell_-_Jami_Masjid,_Delhi_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg
"The Purana Qila, Delhi." 1796.
“The Purana Qila, Delhi, engraved: The Western Entrance of Shere Shah’s Fort.” 1796. Aquatint, watercolor and pencil. Image © 2019 Andrew Clayton-Payne. Fair use license. via https://www.clayton-payne.com/artworks/9406/
"The Sacred Tree of the Hindoos at Gyah, Bahar, March 1790." No date.
“The Sacred Tree of the Hindoos at Gyah, Bahar, March 1790.” No date. Watercolor over graphite. Image © The Morgan Library and Museum, New York. Fair use license. via https://www.themorgan.org/collection/drawings/122946#
"Mausoleum of Kausim Solemanee, at Chunar Gur, 1803." Plate 23
“Mausoleum of Kausim Solemanee, at Chunar Gur, 1803.” Plate 23 from “Oriental Scenery Part 3: Containing Twenty-Four Views of the Architecture, Antiques and Landscape Scenery of Hindoostan, London,” published in 1803. Hand colored aquatint. Image © 2019 SHAPIRO AUCTIONEERS Woollahra. Fair use license. via

Memories of India through a Western eye. British. William Carpenter, watercolorist (1818-1899).

"Tank & Marble Causeway the Sikh Temple Amritsar."
“Tank & Marble Causeway the Sikh Temple Amritsar.” ca. February, 1854. Image © SikhMuseum.com. Fair use license. via http://www.uniindia.com/exhibition-of-sikh-paintings-by-western-artists-displayed-for-first-time-in-india/entertainment/news/1566853.html
"Interior of the Golden Temple, Amritsar." Probably painted in February, 1854.
“Interior of the Golden Temple, Amritsar.” Probably painted in February, 1854. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London 2017. Fair use license. via http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O430745/interior-of-the-golden-temple-painting-carpenter-william/
"Courtyard of a house in Pune." 1850.
“Courtyard of a house in Pune.” 1850. Image © Victoria and Albert Museum, London 2017. Fair use license. via https://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O108182/courtyard-of-a-house-in-painting-carpenter-william/
"Indian Soldiers on maneuvers in the Punjab."
“Indian Soldiers on maneuvers in the Punjab.” 1855. Image © 2019 Sotheby’s. Fair use license. via http://www.sothebys.com/en/auctions/ecatalogue/2017/of-royal-and-noble-descent-l17306/lot.67.html

More prettiness this time of a bejeweled kind from “Jeypore (Jaipur) Enamels”, a folio with 28 chromolithograph plates. S. S. Jacob and Surgeon-Major Thomas Holbein Hendley, makers. Published in London in 1886.

Enamel and gold-plate jewelry.
Enamel and gold-plate jewelry. Collection of the New York Public Library. NYPL Digital Image ID: 831904. In the public domain. Please click through the link for a description of each item. via http://www.victorianweb.org/history/empire/india/nypl6.html
Plate 2. A series of designs for the backs of daggers or hunting knives.
Plate 2. A series of designs for the backs of daggers, or hunting knives. Image © Metropress Ltd, (t/a Auction Technology Group) 2019. Fair use license. via https://www.the-saleroom.com/en-gb/auction-catalogues/lyon-and-turnbull/catalogue-id-srly10079/lot-76f7e397-7fbc-4520-bc17-a4f100a012e3
Plate 8. Cup, spoon and saucer that goes with the cup.
Plate 8. Cup, spoon and saucer that goes with the cup. Image © Gros and Delettrez, Paris. Fair use license. via http://www.gros-delettrez.com/html/fiche.jsp?id=2473210&np=3&lng=fr&npp=50&ordre=3&aff=1&r=

This is the first part with more coming as I found enough great images for two posts.

An envisioning . . . 1990 and a sultry afternoon in Bridgetown, Barbados.

Oh to be here.

The trade winds gone off somewhere but back soon. Afternoon on the verandah in the old army barracks just up the hill from the beach.

Decades lived and not ending up where one would have thought. Bombay, London, and then first one West Indian island and then another. Weather better than England but the work much the same.

Like the stories Father told about the army moving him around but different. All French places, those were. French then, they were, but the family morphed somehow into an English speaking British bunch since.

The same tropical trees and almost the same smells. A going back if one squeezes one’s eyes tight enough shut.

The scent of curried goat from somewhere down the hill and music the other way. Mother in a sari and Father coming in the house in his cavalry boots with the heavy noise they made against the tile. A nurse whispering in at the other end of the verandah in the same sort of sing-song lilt.

But not the same. Life comes and gone, and India left. But still, things to hold in one’s hand that bring it back. Prickly and studded brighter than the sun. A turban ornament, but funny. Cartier, not Indian, really, but a shop in Paris where the cousins lived. For one of the grand balls they held in 1903 when the king’s brother came out from London. Delhi Durbar and everyone positively dripping diamonds.

Not exactly gone. . . well mostly. . . .Emeralds up and left but in one’s mind. . . .nothing ever really gone if you remember it . . .

This is not my story. It is, rather, the story of my Saint Lucian friend, Charles C., who was old when I was young. Son of a high caste Indian lady and a French army officer at the turn of the last century in Bombay, a time when that was not supposed to be.

Indian turban ornament and brooch (sarpesh). ca. 1900.
Indian turban ornament and brooch (sarpesh). ca. 1900. Gold and silver set with emeralds, diamonds and a hanging natural pearl. Cartier Paris, maker. © The al Thani Collection. All rights reserved. Fair use license. Photo credit: Prudence Cuming Associates Ltd. Image courtesy of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco. via https://museumnetwork.sothebys.com/en/articles/historic-jewels-convene-at-the-legion-of-honor

An envisioning . . . Barbados on a winter evening in 1965 and a watercolor in the back of a picture frame.

Oh to be here.

Bungalow on the outside of town with the trade winds going like mad. 1965 and 1966 soon to be born.

Grandmother gone but the house shut up since. The little house rented out to tourist people but the big house empty. Down for Christmas and Mother opening up the closet in the hall.

Things needing to be gone through and given out. A brass box covered with maharajahs hunting elephants from the old days. Grandfather’s own grandfather the one on the top must be.

So rich and a palace with gems the size of a tennis ball or so they say. Dancing girls around every corner and who knows what else.

Grandmother, too. A governess, the aunties say, swept off her feet under a different tropical sun by a gentleman with a wild look in his eye and a diamond the size of a plum stuck to his shirt.

That lost in a poker game and everyone off to somewhere in Empire. India to Uganda and then Singapore. Grandmother always wanting to get back to Wales but no. Had to be somewhere warm.

Time and more time. The closet done and the rest begun. Pictures to take down with each one kissed. Pictures of aunts and uncles from wherever they ended up. Left behind in different places, no life left at home and a new home somewhere where whoever it is in Buckingham Palace still reigns. A real home wherever one was born and the others not.

But the last picture with another inside. Flowers it is. But the English country garden kind in the pale colors places with pale suns always have. Great grandmother’s it must have been from the big house they had to sell.

Everything gone but still. . . . . things scattered around to remember with . . .  forever to remember them in.

August. 1905. Edith Holden, artist.
August. 1905. British. Plate from “The Country Diary of An Edwardian Lady.” Edith Holden, author and illustrator (1871-1920). via http://www.morning-earth.org/ARTISTNATURALISTS/AN_images/HOLDEN/08August7.jpg.

Artwork in the public domain.

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