Portraits of Native Americans from before a lot of people decided to go out west and it was never the same again. From George Catlin’s work, “O-Kee-Pa; a Religious Ceremony; and other Customs of the Mandans,” an account of an annual religious ceremony practiced by the Mandan tribe. Published in 1867.

Page 62. George Catlin, artist. Simonau and Toovey, lithographers. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n62/mode/1up
Page 71. George Catlin, artist. Simonau and Toovey, lithographers. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n70/mode/1up
Page 95. George Catlin, artist. Simonau and Toovey, lithographers. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n94/mode/1up

These were published towards the end of Catlin’s life, but the images and the text refer back to a visit in July of 1832 when Catlin was joined by, among others, a J. Kipp who was agent for the Missouri Fur Company.

More portraits of Native Americans from before a lot of people decided to go out west and it was never the same again. From George Catlin’s work, “O-Kee-Pa; a Religious Ceremony; and other Customs of the Mandans,” an account of an annual religious ceremony practiced by the Mandan tribe. Published in 1867.

Page 47. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n47/mode/2up
Page 53. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n51/mode/2up
Page 57. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n57/mode/2up

Note: there are 13 of these plates, there being one more post to come. These were published towards the end of Catlin’s life, but the images and the text refer back to a visit in July of 1832 when Catlin was joined by, among others, a J. Kipp who was agent for the Missouri Fur Company.

Portraits of Native Americans from before a lot of people decided to go out west and it was never the same again. From George Catlin’s work, “O-Kee-Pa; a Religious Ceremony; and other Customs of the Mandans,” an account of an annual religious ceremony practised by the Mandan tribe. Published in 1867.

“Two Mandan men and one woman.” Page 20. Simonau and Toovey, lithographers after a drawing by Catlin. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n19/mode/2up
“Bird’s eye view of part of the Mandan Village.” Plate II, page 25. Simonau and Toovey, lithographers after a drawing by Catlin. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n25/mode/2up
“Lodge Interior.” Plate 3, page 39. Simonau and Toovey, lithographers after a drawing by Catlin. Collections of the University of Pittsburgh Library System.  Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation, digitalizing sponsor. In the public domain due to age. via https://archive.org/details/okeepareligiousc00catl/page/n39/mode/2up

Note: there are 13 of these plates, these are merely the first three with more posts with the others yet to come. These were published towards the end of Catlin’s life, but the images and the text refer back to a visit in July of 1832 when Catlin was joined by, among others, a J. Kipp who was agent for the Missouri Fur Company.

More American landscapes, these from a bit further back in the 1830’s. George Catlin, artist. Living from 1796 to 1872, he was the first white man to depict Plains Indians in their native territory. Painted many portraits, too, but these are pictures of places he saw.

"The Three Domes, Clay Bluffs 15 Miles above the Mandan Village." 1832.
“The Three Domes, Clay Bluffs 15 Miles above the Mandan Village.” 1832. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. In the public domain. via https://www.beverlyamitchell.com/the-three-domes-clay-bluffs-15-miles-above-the-mandan-village-by-george-catlin.html

"View from Floyd's Grave, 1300 Miles above Saint Louis." 1832.
“View from Floyd’s Grave, 1300 Miles above Saint Louis.” 1832. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. In the public domain. via https://americanart.si.edu/artwork/view-floyds-grave-1300-miles-above-st-louis-4427

"Beautiful Prairie Bluffs, Upper Mississippi." 1835.
“Beautiful Prairie Bluffs, Upper Mississippi.” 1835. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC. In the public domain. via http://www.museumsyndicate.com/item.php?item=45679

Native Americans living wild and free before America turned around and bit . .. . George Catlin, artist. Living from 1796 to 1872, he made numerous trips out beyond the Cumberland Gap painting what for us and their descendants is a lost world that is never coming back . . .. except for here . . .

"Oó-je-en-á-he-a, Woman Who Lives in a Bear's Den." 1832.
“Oó-je-en-á-he-a, Woman Who Lives in a Bear’s Den.” 1832. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. via https://americanart.si.edu/artwork/oo-je-en-he-woman-who-lives-bears-den-4476.

"Kee-mo-ra-nia, No English, a Dandy." 19th c.
“Kee-mo-ra-nia, No English, a Dandy.” 19th c. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. via https://fr.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fichier:George_Catlin_-_Kee-mo-r%C3%A1-nia,_No_English,_a_Dandy_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg.

"White Cloud, Head Chief of the Iowas." 1818-1844.
“White Cloud, Head Chief of the Iowas.” 1818-1844. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. via https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:George_Catlin_-_The_White_Cloud,_Head_Chief_of_the_Iowas_-_Google_Art_Project.jpg

"Buffalo Bull's Back Fat (Stu-mick-o-súcks) Head Chief of the Blood Tribe (Blackfoot)." 1832.
“Buffalo Bull’s Back Fat (Stu-mick-o-súcks) Head Chief of the Blood Tribe (Blackfoot).” 1832. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. via https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d9/Immagine-Catlin1.jpg.

"Chin-cha-pee, Fire Bug That Creeps, Wife of Pigeon's Egg Head." 1832.
“Chin-cha-pee, Fire Bug That Creeps, Wife of Pigeon’s Egg Head.” 1832. Oil on canvas. Collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. via https://americanart.si.edu/artwork/chin-cha-pee-fire-bug-creeps-wife-pigeons-egg-head-4054.

All artwork in the public domain because the painter has been dead since 1872.